Jun 292007
 

In today’s three part tutorial I’m first going to show you how to create a sign in form directly on a Domino page. Secondly, I’m going to show how you can embed a Domino form, with security, directly into a floating pane and submit it using Ajax. Last I’m showing you some code how to display a Domino view on the page using JSON and give you some of the code we at SNAPPS used for the Lotus Quickr templates we developed, free for you to download.

I have also created a short Flash preview of what I’m going to show today. It’s a good idea to view that first to get an idea of what I’m trying to explain.

Prerequisites

To get this to work there are a few things that are required and you need a basic to medium skill-set of how JavaScript works inside Domino.

The Domino server has to be version 7.0.2 or later. This is because we are getting JSON from the view and this was introduced on that version of the Domino server.

We need to have the Dojo Toolkit library downloaded to our Domino server. Unfortunately, Domino on Windows has a problem. The file name Shadow.js cannot be used. The file just does not show up through the web server. I have created a Dojo version where Shadow.js is renamed to Shadow2.js and everywhere it’s being referenced is changed. This is the version of Dojo that IBM is using inside Lotus Quickr 8. You can download it here: [download#5#nohits]. Remember to put the “dojo” folder inside the “html” directory on your Domino server. If you have a Lotus Quickr 8 server, you don’t have to do this step, but you need to modify the “src=” of the JavaScript to “/qphtml/html/dojo/dojo.js”.

We also must have session based authentication on our Domino server for the Sign In form to work. If you don’t you can still use the other code in this tutorial.

You need to download the database with all the code in it, [download#6#nohits]. You don’t want to type it all yourself do you?

Embedded Sign In FormSign In Form on a Domino Page or Form

What I’m doing here is a sign in form that we can put directly on a Domino Page or Form to let the user sign in without leaving the page to go to the Domino log-in form that redirects us back to where we came from. There is not much code to it. Let’s start.

We start by looking at the “HTML Head Content” of the “Dojo Forms Submission” Page.

"<script type="text/javascript" src="/dojo/dojo.js"></script>" + @NewLine +
"<script>" + @NewLine +
"var dbURL = '/" + @WebDbName + "';" + @NewLine +
"</script>" + @NewLine +
"<style>" + @NewLine +
"body, td {
color:#333333;
font-family:Helvetica,Geneva,Arial,Verdana,Sans-Serif;
font-size: 0.9em;
}" + @NewLine +
"</style>" + @NewLine

All we are doing here is calling the Dojo JavaScript file, adding a variable for the database URL and adding some style to our page. Next we look at the “JS Header”. Inside here we have 239 lines of JavaScript code. Don’t worry, we are only going to use 14 of them for this first part of the tutorial. The function we are using for the sign in is “directLogin()”.

function directLogin(){
var poststring = "username=" + dojo.byId("Username").value + "&password=" + dojo.byId("Password").value;
var kw = {
url: "/names.nsf?Login",
postContent: poststring,
load: function(t, txt, e) {
location.href = location.href;
},
error: function(t, e) {
alert(e.message);
}
};
dojo.io.bind(kw);
}

As you can see we are constructing a string variable “poststring”, by adding the values of the “Username” and the “Password” fields to it. We are setting the “url” to “names.nsf?Login” and the “postContent” to our “poststring” variable. The “load” is what what we want to do after the Domino server returns that it was successful. All I do here is reload the page. We don’t have to that, we are actually signed in, but for the Hide-When formulas to take effect we need to in this case. More on this later. Dojo takes care of the rest by calling the “dojo.io.bind” and passing in the “kw” object.

Let’s look at the HTML part of our Domino Page. At the top of the Domino Page I have added some text to show who you are signed as and what access level you have. In a normal application, you would obviously not have those there.

<fieldset id="loginFieldset" style="padding-left:5px; padding-right:5px; padding-bottom:5px; width:200px;">
<legend style="font-weight:bold;"> Sign In </legend>
Name<br />
<input name="Username" id="Username" value="" maxlength=256 style="width:100%;" /><br />
Password</br>
<input name="Password" id="Password" value="" type=password maxlength=256 style="width:100%;" /><br /><br />
<input type="button" value="Sign In" onclick="directLogin()" />
</fieldset>

We make the form pretty by adding the “fieldset” and “label” HTML tags. The important parts of the HTML code are the two fields and the button. There is nothing special with the fields other than they need to be there and the only thing I added the call to our function. I have also added a Domino Hide-When formula to this text.

@TextToNumber(@UserAccess(@DbName ; [AccessLevel])) > 2

All that the above @Formula does is hide the HTML if we have a user access greater than 2. Which is Reader access. This is the Anonymous access to the database. Default is Author. That’s it, not to hard was it?

Embed Domino forms and submit them using Ajax

Now lets embed a Domino form inside a floating pane on our page. This is not done by any IFrames or pop-up windows. This is the actual HTML code of the form in question embedded onto our page. We will also submit this form using Dojo’s Ajax way.

The form we are going to embed is called “Favorites”. It is a very basic form with three Text fields, a Checkbox field and a Readers field together with two buttons.

I also created a view called “Favorites View” that contains the documents using the form. More on that later in the next part of the tutorial.

First we add some HTML to our Domino Page so that we can open up the form in the floating pane.

<a href="<Computed Value>">Sign Out</a> | <a href="javascript:createNewDocument();">New Document</a>

The first link is the “Sign Out” link. It’s only there so that we can sign out. (It really belongs to the previous section.) The second link is our link to create a new “Favorite” document. As you can see it calls the function “createNewDocument()”. Let’s take a look at that code inside the “JS Header” on our Domino Page.

function createNewDocument(){
if(!dojo.byId("ff-newdocument")){
var oDiv = document.createElement("div");
oDiv.innerHTML = "Loading...";
document.body.appendChild(oDiv);

var floatingPaneAttr = {
position: "absolute",
top: "100px",
left: "100px",
width: "300px",
height: "255px"
};

for(var s in floatingPaneAttr){
oDiv.style[s] = floatingPaneAttr[s];
}

var floatingPaneArgs = {
widgetId: "ff-newdocument",
title: "New Document",
href: dbURL + "/Favorites?OpenForm",
displayCloseAction: true,
toggle: "fade",
windowState: "normal",
cacheContent: false,
refreshOnShow: true,
hasShadow: true,
executeScripts: true
};

g_FloatingPane = dojo.widget.createWidget("FloatingPane", floatingPaneArgs, oDiv);
}else{
dojo.widget.byId("ff-newdocument").show();
}
}

First we check that we don’t already have an object named “ff-newdocument”. If we don’t we create a new Div element and append it to the document body. Then we add some style attributes to the Div. Here you see an example of how to use JSON directly in your JavaScript code. Then we create the “floatingPaneArgs” object. This is again Dojo and we are using a Dojo widget called “FloatingPane”.

The interesting part of the object is the “href” value. As you can see we are using the “dbURL” variable that we declared in the “HTML Head Content” area of our Page. If you recall, it was using an @Formula; @WebDbName. We then add the name of our form and the ?OpenForm to the string. What the other name-value pairs are I’m not going to go over here.

The last thing we do is to create our FloatingPane widget. We also have to declare to Dojo that we are going to use the FloatingPane widget, so we add this code to the top of our JavaScript.

dojo.require("dojo.widget.FloatingPane");

That’s all there is to it. You can see an example of what it looks like when we open the pane to the right.

As you can see, I have also added a Set Reader Access check-box on the form. If checked, only authenticated users can see the document.

If you open the “Favorites” form and examine the two buttons you’ll see that they both contain JavaScript calls. The Cancel button calls “cancelFavoritesForm();” and the Submit button calls “submitFavoritesForm();”.

These two JavaScript functions do not exist on the Domino Form. They are both in the “JS Header” on our Page. Another proof that we are not doing this by an IFrame or a pop-up window. These two functions looks like this:

function cancelFavoritesForm(){
if(dojo.widget.byId("ff-newdocument")){
dojo.widget.byId("ff-newdocument").closeWindow();
}
}

function submitFavoritesForm(){
var formObject = document.forms["_Favorites"];
var kw = {
formNode: formObject,
load: function(t, txt, e) {
dojo.widget.byId("ff-newdocument").closeWindow();
//Reload view
getDocumentViewJSON();
},
error: function(t, e) {
alert(e.message);
}
};
dojo.io.bind(kw);
}

The first function, “cancelFavoritesForm” is not to exciting, it just closes our Floating Pane. The same result as if you click the X at the top of the Pane. The “submitFavoritesForm” is much more interesting. In Domino all forms you open from the web gets a form tag with the name of the form with an _ (underscore) before it. So we create an object “formObject” by calling document.forms[“_Favorites”]. Now the fun begins. In dojo.io.bind we can declare a “formNode” value with the form object as it’s value. Dojo recognize that you are passing in a form and submits it using Ajax in the background. You can even have WebQuerySave agents run on the form and it will work. Really super cool.

Just as in our Sign-In JavaScript function, the “load” event is where we declare what will happen after the server returns that it was successfully loaded. Here we call “closeWindow” to close the Pane. We also call a function “getDocumentViewJSON()”. That is for the last part of this tutorial. You can see an example of much more complex Domino Form embedded into a web page by clicking the image on the left. This is from one of the Lotus Quickr templates that we have created, QContacts. It has a WebQuerySave agent, multiple tabs, attachment control and much more. There is also a function called “openDocument” where we just open documents after they have been saved. It looks a lot like the “createNewDocument” function I described earlier. We call this function inside our JSON function. Let’s jump to that.

Displaying a Domino View with JSON

The last part of today’s tutorial is all about Domino views, getting JSON from them and displaying the items on our Domino Page. First on our Page, we add a empty table to the HTML.

<table border=0 cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0 width="500">
<thead id="documentHead"></thead>
<tbody id="documentBody"></tbody>
</table>

This is where the documents show up when the JavaScript call is done. We also need to add some more functions to the “JS Header”. Don’t worry, it looks worse then it is.

function getDocumentViewJSON(){
var sURL = dbURL + '/favoritesview?ReadViewEntries&Outputformat=JSON';
sURL += '&Start=' + g_NumOfStartDoc;
sURL += '&Count=' + g_NumOfDocs;
dojoGetJSON(sURL, 'printDocumentTable');
}

dojo.addOnLoad(function(){
g_DocumentHead = dojo.byId("documentHead");
g_DocumentBody = dojo.byId("documentBody");
getDocumentViewJSON();
});

The bottom JavaScript, “dojo.addOnLoad” is a really handy way of not calling anything until we are sure that everything on our page has loaded in the browser window. All we do here is to assign two global variables for the table header and the table body and call the function above, “getDocumentViewJSON()”. That is also the function we called from within our submit function in the previous section. In that function, we create a URL string that we pass to the “dojoGetJSON” function. We also pass in a string “printDocumentTable” to that function. That is the name of the function that we want to call when the server has passed back the JSON to the”dojoGetJSON” function. The two functions “dojoGetJSON” and “returnJSONValue” I’m not going to examine in this tutorial, it would be to long. All I can say is that “dojoGetJSON” get JSON back from a server and “returnJSONValue” returns specific column values from a Domino View. Examine them and try them out. We at SNAPPS use them daily in our code. Let’s look at the “printDocumentTable” function instead.

function printDocumentTable(oJSON){
try{
var oRow, oCell;
if(oJSON["@toplevelentries"] && oJSON["@toplevelentries"] > 0){
var viewentries = oJSON.viewentry;
var n_viewentries = viewentries.length;
var unidAttr, entrydata, sTitle;

//Delete all rows in the table
var iRows = g_DocumentBody.rows.length;
for (var i = 0; i < iRows; i++){
g_DocumentBody.deleteRow(0);
}

if(n_viewentries > 0 && g_DocumentHead.rows.length < 1){
oRow = g_DocumentHead.insertRow(-1);

oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
oCell.style.fontWeight = "bold";
oCell.innerHTML = "Name";

oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
oCell.style.fontWeight = "bold";
oCell.innerHTML = "Pet";

oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
oCell.style.fontWeight = "bold";
oCell.innerHTML = "Color";
}

for (var i = 0; i < n_viewentries; i++){
unidAttr = viewentries[i]["@unid"];
entrydata = viewentries[i].entrydata;

oRow = g_DocumentBody.insertRow(-1);
oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
sTitle = returnJSONValue(entrydata[0]).items[0];
oCell.innerHTML = '<a href="javascript:openDocument('' + unidAttr + '', '' + sTitle + '');">' + sTitle + '</a>';

oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
oCell.innerHTML = returnJSONValue(entrydata[1]).items[0];
oCell = oRow.insertCell(-1);
oCell.innerHTML = returnJSONValue(entrydata[2]).items[0];
}
}
}catch(e){}
}

All I’m doing here is to create rows and cells with values for every document I get back from the call to the view. It might look like a lot of code but it is mostly repeated steps from creating rows and cells and adding values to them.

I will explain a few things though. “unidAttr” is just the UNID of the document. “entrydata” in the for loop represent all the column values that a document have. Calling returnJSONValue(entrydata[0]) returns an object with column type and an items array, even if there was only one value in the column for that document. Remember that a column can have multiple values for each document, a field with multiple values for instance. The function also returns the type of column the items come from, so that we can know what to do with the items. If for instance the column contains date strings we can parse them in the correct format for the application using JavaScript.

That’s if for this tutorial. I hope you have found it useful and maybe even learned something. As always please submit comments on the code and how I can do it better. Until next time. UPDATE! I have corrected some spelling errors. Why can’t everybody just learn Swedish?

  14 Responses to “Embedded Domino forms with Ajax submit and JSON view refresh”

  1. “Why can’t everybody just learn Swedish?”

    Det är en bra fråga. I alla fall jag har lärt att tala svenska.

    Tack så mycket!

  2. […] we are getting into some eye candy and heavy Dojo work. I showed you a preview of it in my post Embedded Domino forms with Ajax submit and JSON view refresh a couple of days back. From Rob Novak’s blog: Contacts? Why would you need that when you have […]

  3. Hi Viktor.
    I’m trying to create an agent or form that will be called by an ajax call and make a lookup for the users internet address.
    This agent or form will receive a list of user names, and that users maybe or maybe not be part of domino users.

    I create a Agent that only makes the lookup in the $Users view. Do not work for all the case and user names.

    Then I create a form. Now I need to make a loop inside the form but I couldn’t figure out how can I make a loop inside a form. I’ve tryed this:

    @{@For(n :=1; n

  4. Is there a version of this example db using the 0.9 for 1.0 version of Dojo?

  5. Jeff,
    Not yet, but I’m working on it.

  6. i think i will bw better if a sample database is given

  7. hello!
    fine getting your database with the code…but the default is only on author. – Unable to open the DB in designer.
    Regards
    werz99

  8. werz99,
    If you open it locally in Designer first you can set any access level you want.

  9. function submitFavoritesForm() is not saving the form any more? Also dojo.io.bind is not defined in 1. and above? Do you have an updated for this code?
    Thank you

  10. Any workaround for codes without dojo.io.bind? Appreciate a new updated version…

    Thank you

  11. sandubuo and premjee,
    I’ll update the code as soon as I have some time.
    The code we used for “The Great Code Giveaway” this year at Lotusphere use updated 1.1.1+ Dojo code and is used to submit several different Domino forms. Click on the download link at the top right of this site.

  12. Nice code.. but where I work, there are settings in motions that I currently can override and that is set as a web rule:

    */*.nsf/*?ReadViewEntries* –> actionDenied.htm

    I guess I can create a simple form and render output using @dblookups and stuff into a [{}] to use as computed JSON.

    As almost all examples and demos I see use the readviewEntries&Outputformat=JSON I do ask myself..

    Why would the company block the ReadViewEntries (it was said for security reasons)? Any good ideas on fighting that (or not to fight it)?

    Right now, I have to build my own objects and it works but takes time and most of the time I need to adapt my JS-code. Any hints on “fighting the power” or keep doing objects myself!

  13. […] a similar note: Viktor Krantz has created a post on how to create a sign in form directly on a Domino page using the Dojo toolkit. Very cool! Related posts (automatically generated):Dojomino 1.1-0: Dojo 1.1 […]

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